Freedom to Play and Sing: 2013

The Conference for Musicians and the Alexander Technique

March 15-17, 2013

SHETLER STUDIOS AND THEATERS:

244 West 54th Street, (between 8th Ave and Broadway) New York, NY

Developed by Ann Rodiger and Judith Muir

Produced by the Balance Arts Center and Institute for Music and Health

Come join us for Freedom to Play and Sing: 2013

This conference is designed for performers, teachers and student of music and voice, as well as, Alexander Technique Teachers.

We will explore how the Alexander Technique supports and complements musicians and vocalists in their practice, rehearsal, and performance. We will discover how the use of our own instrument directly affects the quality of tone, phrasing, and expression.

The conference has been designed to allow for in-depth presentations in areas fundamental to music making and performance. The conference will include a panel discussion on how The Alexander Technique contributes to creativity and expression. We will also have an informal concert by some of the conference presenters.

We invite you to participate in learning, sharing and building community.

Come join us!

Fees:

Full Professional Conference Fee before March 1st: $225; After March 1st: $250

Full Student Conference Fee before March 1st: $160; after March 1st: $180

There are single workshop rates available.

Fees and registration information here.

FRIDAY March 15

6:00 pm: Registration Opens at Shetler Studios and Theaters (244 West 54th Street)

6:30-7:00 pm: Introduction to The Alexander Technique

7:00-9:00 pm: Introductions, Activities, and Social Gathering

SATURDAY March 16

9:00 am-12:00 pm: SESSION 1

A. The Voice and the Self

Beret Arcaya

B. Optimal Movement Strategies for Reliable Musical Results

Evangeline Benedetti

C. Come Blow Your Horn!: Actuating the back muscles to free up the breathing.

Judith Muir

12:00-1:00 pm: LUNCH

1:00-3:00 pm: SESSION 2

A. Keys to Freedom: Unlocking your Creative and Emotional Self at the Piano

Peter Muir

B. Baroque Dance Forms in the Music of Bach and Handel

Thomas Baird

C. From FM’s Whispered Ah to Your Singing Voice

Ann Rodiger

3:15-5:15 pm: SESSION 3

A. Biotensegrity: Suspended Support in Activity

Carol Boggs

B. Alexander Technique: Balancing Body, Mind and Flute

Lisa Lutton

C. The Spine is Your Sound Post; Strings, Springs and Resonance  

Kathe Jarka

5:30-6:30 pm: INFORMAL CONCERT

SUNDAY March 17

9:00-11:00 am: SESSION 5
A.  Banish Burnout:  Rekindle the Flame and Rise Above Pain!

Jennifer Roig-Francoli

B. Embodied Voice

Pyeng Threadgill

C. Prepare Your Performance Body: Find your Back, Breath, and Balance

 Ann Rodiger

11:00 am-12:00 pm: BRUNCH

12:00-2:00 pm: SESSION 6

A. Comparative Listening

Beret Arcaya

B. Stagefright ~~ Stage Freedom: Transcending Performance Anxiety

Peter Muir

2:15-3:15 pm: Panel Discussion

How the Alexander Technique Contributes to Creativity and Expression

Beret Arcaya, Corinne Cassini, Bill Connington, David Homan, and Ariel Weiss

3:15-4:00 pm: CLOSING DISCUSSION

SIGN UP HERE.

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS:

The Voice and the Self by Beret Arcaya

How to build a vocal instrument and vocal authenticity.  This is a workshop that will be about all aspects of singing technique, and will explore all the myths and falsehoods that have crept into the way singing is taught today.

Beret Arcaya has maintained ongoing, concomitant careers in classical singing and acting (performing and teaching) and the Alexander Technique (teaching) for over 31 years.  She did her musical training at the Juilliard School and the Manhattan School of Music and studied acting intensively with Uta Hagen in New York City.  She has performed in everything from Equity summer stock to soap opera (NBC, CBS and ABC) and film (MGM) to chamber music and opera (she won first prize at the Puccini Foundation vocal competition, made her debut at Avery Fischer Hall 1974 and has sung in the U.S., Germany, Switzerland, Spain, Italy and Venezuela.)Beret earned her teaching certificate in Alexander Technique at the ACAT*-NY Teacher Training Program under Judith Liebowitz in 1981 and undertook additional 3 year  training with Walter and Dilys Carrington at The Constructive Teaching Center in London. She recertified with them and completed this training in 1999. Beret earned her teaching certificate in Alexander Technique at the ACAT*-NY Teacher Training Program under Judith Liebowitz in 1981 and undertook additional 3 year training with Walter and Dilys Carrington at The Constructive Teaching Center in London. She recertified with them and completed this training in 1999. She has combined her knowledge of music and the Alexander Technique in Master Classes for singers and musicians given all over Europe, most notably at the Salzburg Easter Festival under the auspices of the Kominsky Foundation. She has combined her knowledge of music and the Alexander Technique in Master Classes for singers and musicians given all over Europe, most notably at the Salzburg Easter Festival under the auspices of the Kominsky Foundation.  She has combined her knowledge of music and the Alexander Technique in Master Classes for singers and musicians given all over Europe, most notably at the Salzburg Easter Festival under the auspices of the Kominsky Foundation.She was an ACAT board member from 1982-1985 and a founding member of the North American Society of Teachers of the Alexander Technique (NASTAT), now known as the American Society for the Alexander Technique (AmSAT).Currently she is a member of the Spanish (APTAE), English (STAT) and American (AmSAT) Societies for the Alexander Technique.

Optimal Movement Strategies for Reliable Musical Results by Evangeline Benedetti

A workshop in which Ms. Benedetti will bring together her expertise as a master Alexander Technique teacher and its application to performance, drawing on her more than 40 years performing as a cellist in the New York Philharmonic. Over thousands of performances collaborating with colleagues and conductors at the highest caliber under the most demanding conditions, she has been able to study movement from this extraordinary perspective.  The demands on the body coupled with the need for musical excellence require a technique that is flexible, reliable and reproducible under pressure.  Bring your questions and be prepared to experience the paradox of freedom under pressure."

Evangeline Benedetti, cellist, active soloist, and chamber musician, has been a member of the New York Philharmonic since 1967, one of the first women cellists to be accepted into the organization. She appears regularly on the Philharmonic Ensembles series at Merkin Concert Hall in New York, including performances with guest artists Yefim Bronfman, Vladimir Feltsman, and Jerome Lowenthal. As a member of the New York Trio Concertant, she toured Japan in 1994 and 1995. In addition to the numerous recordings she has participated in with the New York Philharmonic, she has recorded the Prokofiev and Shostakovich Sonatas for cello and piano with Pedja Muzijevic that has been released by Musicians Showcase. Ms. Benedetti’s second love and career is teaching. She brings a unique approach to this endeavor as a certified teacher of the Alexander Technique, which is a study of physical re-education based on integration of mind and body. Her cellistic approach is steeped in the tradition of Bernard Greenhouse, Zara Nelsova, and Janos Starker, her teachers. She also performed in master classes with Pablo Casals. Her education, after childhood studies at the University of Texas String Project with Phyllis Young, was at the Manhattan School of Music, where she earned her Bachelor of Music and Master of Music degrees. She served on the faculty there for more than 20 years. Combining her knowledge of performance and the Alexander Technique makes her teaching approach applicable to all instruments. She has taught musicians in the San Diego, Dallas, and Fort Worth symphonies and has given master classes at Brooklyn College School of Music, Manhattan School of Music, Mannes College of Music, and The Juilliard School. She taught a master class in Pyongyang, North Korea while on tour with the orchestra.  As part of the Philharmonic’s Mentors and Protégés series, Ms. Benedetti has made several presentations at Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Lincoln Triangle. In New York. Currently, she teaches privately and in workshops. Ms. Benedetti serves on the executive boards of  the Violoncello Society of New York and the Bloomingdale School of Music.

Come Blow Your Horn! Actuating the back muscles to free up the breathing by Judith Muir

During this workshop we will explore and experience how to activate and energize the mechanisms of support that hold us up to help you "Blow Your Horn" more easily. Like all of Alexander's work it involves several parts:
               -Becoming aware of the ideas that we have acquired about breathing, support, pressure and wind
               -Developing awareness of what we are really doing
               -Deleting inefficient patterns of co-ordination
               -Enhancing our mechanisms of support

Judith Muir M.M. M.AmSAT., is a senior Alexander Technique teacher with thirty years of international experience. Originally from the UK where she trained with Walter Carrington, one of the most influential Alexander Technique teachers in the world, she moved to the USA and became a founding member of the American Society of Alexander Teachers (AmSAT), as well as Vice-Chair of the American Center for the Alexander Technique, New York. She is currently Director of an AmSAT approved teacher training course and has helped train students to become certified teachers of the Alexander Technique on three continents. Her past and present students include members of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, New York City Opera, flutist Sir James Galway, and actors Greta Scacchi and Chris Noth. Her background as a professional musician gives her an insider’s perspective on many of the issues faced by performers and strongly influences her teaching. Trained at Manhattan School of Music and The Royal Academy of Music, London, she is a distinguished clarinetist who has performed classical and jazz concerts internationally, including Carnegie Hall, St. Martin’s in the Fields, London, and Wigmore Hall in London. She and her husband Peter Muir are Directors of the Institute for Music and Health in the Hudson Valley www.musichealth.net where they teach the Diamond Method for Music and run many programs for people with disabilities.

For twelve years she taught the Alexander Technique at Bard College as Associate Professor of Theatre, having previously taught at the Actors’ Movement Studio in New York City, Rutgers University’s Mason Gross School of the Arts, and the Powerhouse Theatre Apprentice Program, Vassar College.

Keys to Freedom: Unlocking your Creative and Emotional Self at the Piano by Peter Muir

This workshop presents holistic principles aimed to release your creativity and free up your piano-playing physically and emotionally. Drawing from the work of music and health pioneer John Diamond, M.D., pedagogue Abby Whiteside, F. M. Alexander, and music education researcher Edwin Gordon, among others, topics include: refining your ear; overcoming physical tension by playing from your center; optimizing improvisation; how to learn more efficiently; and enhancing co-ordination at the keyboard. Regardless of your level of experience, there will be much to learn. Come prepared to play or just audit – your choice.

Peter Muir, Ph.D., is an authority in using music for mental, physical and spiritual wellness.  He is an internationally acclaimed classical and jazz pianist, composer, conductor, musicologist, and pedagogue, and director of the Institute of Music and Health in the Hudson Valley, NY, which teaches the unique work of his mentor John Diamond, M.D., the foremost authority in the field of music and health. Dr. Muir is much in demand as a performer, keynote speaker and presenter at conferences, and is a currently lecturer at The Graduate Institute, CT, as well as a former head of keyboards and director of jazz at Westminster School, London.  His approach is based on the assumption that music is at its most powerful and positive when made with the entire self, and addresses the psychological, physical, emotional, and cognitive aspects of music-making as a symbiotic whole.  Whether working with a professional musician at the highest level of functioning, or a person with profound disabilities entirely new to the act of music-making, Dr. Muir’s vision is the same: to best bring out the Music that resides in everyone, so as to enhance their creative, musical, and personal potential.

Baroque Dance Forms in the Music of Bach and Handel by Thomas Baird

You’ve played sarabandes, menuets, bourées, gavottes and gigues – now, learn how to dance them! Participants will learn very basic dance steps that will help them explore all these Baroque dance types, as well as courantes, chaconnes, passacailles, rigaudons and hornpipes. Learning and applying the principles of the Alexander Technique, students will begin with a dance warm-up, and will be guided through basic dance steps and floor patterns. Participants should wear clothing that allows their knees to bend and shoes that are supportive and flexible. Socks are also acceptable.

Thomas Baird is a certified teacher of the Alexander Technique and a graduate of the Balance Arts Center, Ann Rodiger, director. Since 2009 he has assisted Jane Kosminsky in the Dance Division at the Juilliard School, and since 2011 has taught Introduction to the Alexander Technique in Dance at Purchase College. Thomas has private practices in Norwalk, CT and New York City. Mr. Baird is a professional dancer and choreographer with a specialty in Historical Dance. He has provided historically appropriate choreography for Alfano’s “Cyrano de Bergerac” at the Metropolitan Opera, and has choreographed and performed with the New York Philharmonic’s Young People’s Concerts for several years.

From FM’s Whispered Ah to Your Singing Voice by Ann Rodiger

This workshop adapts the material from Ann's Floor Balance and Ease class to freeing the breath for musicians. We will start on the floor with conscious deliberate focus on indentifying the inner breathing column.  You will see how the breath effects your entire body and learn how to focus your air stream for optimal singing and playing.  These movements can be adapted to create your own warm-up for practice, rehearsal, and performance.

Ann Rodiger is the founder and director of the Balance Arts Center and the Balance Arts Center Teacher Training Course. She has been teaching the Alexander Technique and movement for over 30 years in academic and private settings. She is skilled in Labanotation, Laban Movement Analysis, Bartenieff Fundamentals, Yoga, meditation, and various dance techniques. She maintains private practices in New York City, Berlin and Antwerp. She is the creator and producer of the Freedom to Move, Freedom to Play and co-creator of the Freedom to Act conferences. She has recently published a book, "How To Sit: Your Body at Work".

Biotensegrity: Suspended Support in Activity by Carol Boggs

Carol Boggs has been teaching the Alexander Technique since 1980 and an AmSAT member since 1990 . She practices in greater Washington DC., has offered AT classes for both the Vocal Studies and Dance Departments at George Mason University, and has joined faculties teaching for AT residential courses in the USA, Japan and the Caribbean. Her continuing education credits include, Jessica Wolf's "The Art of Breathing", John Nicholls' "The Carrington Way of Working" and Stephen Shaw's "The Art of Swimming." With a strong movement and dance background including Laban Movement Analysis, Continuum, Tai Chi and Aikido and a keen interest in the interface between Biotensegrity and the AT, Carol continues to explore a lively approach to AT teaching.

The Spine is Your Sound Post; Strings, Springs and Resonance by Kathe Jarka

Alexander Technique: Balancing Body, Mind and Flute by Lisa Lutton

Playing the flute requires balance in your body, a good mental balance, and balance of the flute itself.  If any one of those elements is out of balance, it will impact the other two quite directly.  In this class we’ll experiment with some ideas and activities you can use to help you explore those relationships, restoring better balance in yourself and in your relationship to your flute.

Lisa Lutton is a graduate of the American Center for the Alexander Technique (ACAT) in New York City, and she is certified by the American Society for the Alexander Technique (AmSAT).  Lisa came to the Alexander Technique through her background as a classical flutist.  She received degrees in music performance from Northwestern University (BM) and Mannes College of Music (MM), and she enjoys helping other musicians reach their full potential and stay injury-free with the Alexander Technique.  She has presented classes and demonstrations at Rutgers University, Mannes College of Music, the American Center for the Alexander Technique, the National Flute Association convention, Tulane University, and the Jewish Community Centers in New York and New Orleans.  Lisa continues to be amazed by how powerful the mind/body connection can be in promoting both physical and emotional well-being.  She is an avid student of tai chi and is in training to be a yoga teacher.  She currently lives in New Orleans, where she spends her spare time swing dancing to live jazz.

Banish Burnout: Rekindle the Flame and Rise Above Pain! by Jennifer Roig-Francoli

Inspiring and uplifting spirits, touching and moving hearts, melting into mysterious seas of sound, communicating and connecting with others, sharing and expressing our deepest selves through music...these are all experiences that motivate musicians to devote our lives to art. Unfortunately, it is all too common for music students and professionals in our fast-paced, goal- oriented culture to lose sight of dreams and ideals, and get disconnected from our ultimate purpose. Students can feel frustrated and overwhelmed by technical details, deadlines, the need to make money, performance anxiety, or the ambition required to compete for a dwindling number of jobs. Professionals may fall prey to loss of meaning and disillusionment in repetitive environments that fail to stimulate growth and curiosity. The worst scenarios result in deep personal dissatisfaction and burnout, along with physical pain and injury; yet, so much pain can be prevented by returning to the source of our inspiration. In this workshop, we will address how the Alexander Technique can help prevent burnout and injury, and how it can help musicians recover the healthy joy of music-making if it has been lost. We will discuss obstacles that confront students and professionals and how to stop falling into habitual patterns that lead to psycho-physical suffering. We will give ourselves time, individually and in groups, to explore essential questions such as, “Why do musicians make music, and where does it come from?”; “What does it mean to be a successful artist, and what are the obstacles to success?”; “How can we use our whole selves and our instruments to best advantage, in practice and performance?”; and we will put our musings to practical application with hands-on Alexander Technique explorations, with or without musical instruments.

Jennifer Roig-Francoli is a highly-qualified Alexander Ttchnique teacher in Cincinnati, Ohio, certified by AmSAT, and a professional performing artist.  She is the Owner/Instructor of Balance & Harmony Alexander Technique, where she teachers private and group lessons, as well as Adjunct Instructor of the Alexander Technique at the Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, Xavier University, and UC-CCM Preparatory Department.  She also offers AT workshops and lessons on-site for many other Professional and educational institutions. As a violinist, Jennifer performs on the baroque and modern instruments, and is currently part of the Period-Instrument Duok ADASTRA.  As a research investigator at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, in 2009-2010 Jennifer designed and implemented a pilot study involving teaching the AT to surgeons performing laparoscopic skills.  The aim of hte study, which had very favorable preliminary results was to assess whether the AT can help surgeons with their postural use while performing surgery and thereby prevent the pain and stress that lead to surgical fatigue.  Jennifer co-authored a scheintific paper on this research which was presented in major medical conferences across the US, won second prize for clinical rsearch paper submissions from the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2010, and will be published in the Journal or Urology in October 2011.

Embodied Voice by Pyeng Threadgill

Embodied Voice is a voice and movement class combining Somatic Voicework, The LoVetri Method, with the principles of attention, awareness and inhibition from the Alexander Technique. Together these methods can help one to access improved sound and overall health. Using various approaches from Yoga to Qigong to deepen and channel ones free voice creates new possibilities for breath, improvisation, songwriting and wellness. Embodied Voice is geared towards beginners and professionals alike. This class works with the belief that as we tone the voice, we tone the body and by toning the body, we tone the voice. Students should dress comfortably, bring a Yoga mat and sitting cushion if possible.

Pyeng Threadgill is a professional vocalist/composer/recording artist and certified teacher of both the Alexander Technique and Somatic Voicework, Level III. Pyeng has toured nationally and internationally with her own groups at places such as San Sebastian Jazz Festival (Spain), Atlanta Jazz Festival, Vermont Arts Exchange, Seattle Jazz Festival and even New York's own Rockwood Music Hall. Threadgill is a 2008 recipient of the fellowship in Music Composition from New York Foundation for the Arts for her project Portholes To A Love & Other Short Stories. She teaches on the voice faculty at Brooklyn Conservatory of Music and Alexander Technique at Balance Arts. Pyeng also has a private practice in Brooklyn.

Prepare Your Performance Body: Find your Back, Breath, and Balance by Ann Rodiger

We will with your whole body coordination to fine your balance and center through floor and standing work. There will be focus on breathing, ease, coordination and directions. We will work slowly and carefully to build your awareness of your limbs in relation to your head, neck and back.

(Ann Rodiger bio above)

Comparative Listening by Beret Arcaya

How we can hear the use of the self by the sound of the voice.

(Beret Arcaya bio above)

Stagefright to Stage Freedom: Transcending Performance Anxiety by Peter Muir

There is no aspect of a performer’s life more potentially debilitating, or more universal, than stagefright. Based on the ground-breaking work of music and health pioneer John Diamond, M.D., this workshop examines the psychological causes of the condition and presents an original approach to music-making designed to transform the performance experience. The result is creative liberation and enhanced power for the musician, whatever your level of experience or instrument. Time to deal with the topic at its root and turn your relationship with your audience into a joyful and positive one!

(Peter Muir bio above) 

 

 

Movement Strategies for Musical Results

Bring your instruments to learn practical procedures based on the Alexander Technique.

This unique workshop features the all-encompassing Alexander Technique presented by three experienced teachers, therefore, three perspectives.  It is a rare advantage to be able to work with three teachers in one place.  A person new to the Technique as well as those with experience will benefit from this event.

March 4-6, 2011

PRESENTED BY:
Evangeline Benedetti, Cello, New York Philharmonic
Judith Muir, Clarinet, Co-Director Institute for Music and Health
Ann Rodiger, Director of Balance Arts Center

MC:
David Homan, Executive Director

Supporting Teachers:
Karla Diamond

SCHEDULE:

Friday, March 4:  7-9pm
Introductions and Awareness Activities.

Saturday, March 5:  9am-6:30pm
Three working sessions of lecture/demonstrations will be followed by individual attention in small groups.

Workshop 1:  A Firm Foundation from which to Play
The foundation for all playing is sitting or standing.  We will explore  an optimal way to sit and stand through the familiar squat.  The squat is something we all did as children and possibly do today in activities. Within this framework, we will explore Alexander Technique principles of inhibition, direction, and primary control.
Evangeline Benedetti

Workshop 2:  Breathing is the Essence of Your Playing
Demystifying common misunderstandings about breathing, blowing, air movement and support.  Learn the “Whispered Ah” and how to apply it to improve ease and flow of breath.
Judith Muir

Workshop 3:  Playing with Your Whole Body
Learn to integrate your whole body with your playing while you are sitting and/or standing.  This workshop will include how you approach, contact, and support your instrument.  You will also learn how to be aware of your fellow players, conductor, and audience while you play.
Ann Rodiger

Evening:  Informal gathering at a nearby restaurant.

Sunday, March 6th:  10am-2pm
Master Class setting for select participants who wish to perform with critique.  Each participant will receive 20 minutes to play and receive individual instruction.

LOCATION:
Ripley Grier Studio
520 8th Ave, 16th Floor
New York, NY

The Alexander Technique helps you:

  • Balance, breathe and move while playing
  • Reduce your chance of injury
  • Increase your rehearsal and performance stamina

Presenter Bios:

Evangeline Benedetti, cellist, active soloist, and chamber musician, has been a member of the New York Philharmonic since 1967, one of the first women cellists to be accepted into the organization. She appears regularly on the Philharmonic Ensembles series at Merkin Concert Hall in New York, including performances with guest artists Yefim Bronfman,Vladimir Feltsman, and Jerome Lowenthal. As a member of the New York Trio Concertant, she toured Japan in 1994 and 1995. In addition to the numerous recordings she has participated in with the New York Philharmonic, she has recorded the Prokofiev andShostakovich Sonatas for cello and piano with Pedja Muzijevic that has been released by Musicians Showcase.

Ms. Benedetti’s second love and career is teaching. She brings a unique approach to this endeavor as a certified teacher of the Alexander Technique, which is a study of physical re-education based on integration of mind and body. Her cellistic approach is steeped in the tradition of Bernard Greenhouse, Zara Nelsova, and Janos Starker, her teachers. She also performed in master classes with Pablo Casals. Her education, after childhood studies at the University of Texas String Project with Phyllis Young, was at the Manhattan School of Music, where she earned her Bachelor of Music and Master of Music degrees. She served on the faculty there for more than 20 years.

Combining her knowledge of performance and the Alexander Technique makes her teaching approach applicable to all instruments. She has taught musicians in the San Diego, Dallas, and Fort Worth symphonies and has given master classes at Brooklyn College School of Music, Manhattan School of Music, Mannes College of Music, and The Juilliard School. She taught a master class in Pyongyang, North Korea while on tour with the orchestra.  As part of the Philharmonic’s Mentors and Protégés series, Ms. Benedetti has made several presentations at Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Lincoln Triangle. In New York. Currently, she teaches privately and in workshops.

Ms. Benedetti serves on the executive boards of  the Violoncello Society of New York and the Bloomingdale School of Music.

Judith Muir, M.M. M.AmSAT, is one of the senior teachers of the Alexander Technique in America.  She is a founding member of the American Society of Alexander Teachers (AmSAT), and former Vice-Chair of the American Center for the Alexander Technique, New York, with 27 years of private teaching experience.  She trained in London with Walter Carrington, one of the most influential teachers of hte Alexander Technique in the world.  Her teaching experiences include helping to train students to become certified teachers of the Alexander Technique in Cape Town, South Africa, Manhattan, New York City, and Amherst, Massachusetts.  Currently on the faculty at Bard College in the Theatre Department her past and present students include, members of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, New York City Opera, flutist Sir James Galway, and actors Greta Scacchi and Chris Noth.

As Director of Early Childhood Education at the Institute for Music and Healthin the Hudson Valley, Judith also offers an exceptional international background in woodwind and piano pedagogy.  She has a Masters degree from Manhattan School of Music and is a distinguished clarinetist.  Her performances include classical and jazz concerts on three continents, and her solo and ensemble appearnaces include Carnegie Hall, New York City, St. Martin’s in the Fields, and Wigmore Hll in London U.K. She also runs an award winning music program at the Hawk Meadow Montessori School in Poughkeepsie based on the work of John Diamond M.D. having been personally trained by him for twelve years in his unique approach to music and healing.

David Homan is a composer and collaborative artist.  Dedicated to live composition for theatre, dance, chamber music, and musical theatre, Mr. Homan’s current projects emphasize collaboration in live performance and communication between performers and creators in various fields.

He is the founding director of the Live Arts Collaboration, a non-profit dedicated to producing multidisciplinary works in NYC, and the Executive Director of the American-Israel Cultural Foundation.

Ann Rodiger brings her experience of over 25 years in the Alexander Technique, Laban Movement Analysis and Observation, Dance Notation, movement education, and her own dance performance experience to her work as a teacher. She currently has a private practice in New York City. Ms. Rodiger is the founder and director of the AmSAT approved Balance Arts Center Alexander Technique Teacher Training Course in NYC. Ms. Rodiger has taught graduate and undergraduate level dance courses in several major U.S. Universities, including the University of Illinois-Urbana, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of Hawaii-Manoa, City College of New York, and the Juilliard School. Internationally, she teaches regularly in Berlin, and has taught in France and Switzerland. Ms. Rodiger graduated from the Urbana Center for the Alexander Technique in 1981. She also holds a Masters Degree in Dance from the Ohio State University and a B.S. from the University of Oregon. She has also studied ergonomics, Bartenieff Fundamentals, Feldenkrais, yoga and meditation.  She has been working with singers and musicians for over 25 years.

Listen to the podcast of the Panel discussion here: http://balanceartscenter.podbean.com/2010/06/07/alexander-symposium-5-20-2010/